Musings From A Bookmammal


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Stacking the Shelves–5/9/15

Click to join the fun!

Click to join the fun!

Stacking The Shelves is hosted at Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books we’re adding our shelves–books we’ve bought in physical stores or online, books we’ve borrowed from friends or the library, review books, gifts and ebooks!

This week I have five new books to share–two are used book purchases and three are from the library. Ready? Here we go!

5.9.15

Never Can Say Goodbye: Writers On Their Unshakable Love For New York edited by Shari Botton       I’m an easy mark for a book of pieces by different writers on a common topic, so when I found a “like-new” used copy of this book I snapped it right up. I’ve only visited NY once and while I enjoyed it and would love to go back someday, I can’t ever picture myself living there–so I’m interested to find out why the 27 authors featured in this book can’t picture themselves ever leaving.

Our School: The Inspiring Story of Two Teachers, One Big Idea, and the Charter School That Beat the Odds by Joanne Jacobs       I may not be a teacher anymore, but I still love reading narrative nonfiction about schools, teachers, and students. This book tells the story of how a particular charter high school was formed in San Jose. The reviews I’ve read say that this is NOT an idealistic, fairy tale account of the process, but rather a realistic view of the successes and challenges that occurred–and that’s a plus for me!

Golden State by Stephanie Kegan       I’m always intrigued by stories that tackle the theme of how far we’d go to protect the ones we love–and this novel is about a woman who suspects that her brother is involved in a “Unabomber”-type crime at a college campus.

The Half Brother By Holly LeCraw       This novel takes place over the course of a year at a New England boarding school and involves a love triangle and a long-buried mystery. That’s enough to get me to give it a try!

State By State: A Panoramic Portrait of America edited by Matt Weiland and Sean Wilsey        Fifty authors were each asked to write a piece about one of the fifty states–this book is the result of that project. I don’t think this is a book that I’ll read straight through in one sitting, but I think it’ll be great for browsing. Plus–there are lots of cool charts! (Who knew that Minnesota has the highest voter participation rate???)

How about you? Have you read any of these? Which books found their way into your home this week? Please share!


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Stacking the Shelves: 4/25/15

Click to join the fun!

Click to join the fun!

I’m trying out a new meme this week–Stacking The Shelves is hosted at Tynga’s Reviews and is all about sharing the books we’re adding our shelves–books we’ve bought in physical stores or online, books we’ve borrowed from friends or the library, review books, gifts and ebooks!

This week I have six new books to share and all are borrowed from the library–no book purchases this week. Ready? Here we go!

4.18.15

Alone in the Kitchen With an Eggplant: Confessions of Cooking for One and Dining Alone edited by Jenni Ferrari-Adler

This is one of those backlist titles that I’ve been meaning to read forever. I love to cook, I love reading about food and cooking, and I usually eat alone—this collection has ME written all over it!

The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House by Kate Andersen Browne

I really enjoy behind-the scenes nonfiction, and I’ve also read a lot of books about the Presidency, First Families, etc—so I’ve been looking forward to this new release for quite awhile. I’m about 2/3 of the way through (note the bookmark!) and it’s a good read—just enough gossip to make it interesting but not enough to make it seem tabloidish.

In Some Other World, Maybe by Shari Goldhagen

This novel covers the lives of three teens who meet at the movies in the early 1990s and whose lives continue to intersect over the next twenty years. It’s billed as a “six degrees of separation” novel and that concept has always intrigued me.

Nantucket Sisters by Nancy Thayer

Nancy Thayer is one of my automatic authors—I’ll read anything she writes and have loved her books for over 25 years. This novel was released last year and looks like a great read about female friendship.

Small Mercies by Eddie Joyce

I love novels told through multiple viewpoints, so I’m looking forward to digging into this novel about a family who is still working through their grief over the death of an adult son during 9/11. The story takes place ten years after this loss and spans one week in the life of an Italian Irish American family living on Staten Island. This is a debut novel and I think it’s going to be my next read.

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Levoy

This is a new narrative nonfiction work about a “typical” murder investigation in Los Angeles and the larger issues of urban crime. Not exactly light reading, but I’m in the middle of a big nonfiction reading phase right now and I’ve heard good things about this book.

How about you? Have you read any of these? Which books did you discover this week? Please share!